How Do I Find the DNS Server Being Used By My PC?

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How do I find the domain name server on my PC?

The DNS (Domain Name System) server used by your PC provides the service that maps domain names (like “askleo.com”) to IP addresses (like 67.227.211.203).

There are several different DNS servers your computer could be using.

I’ll look at how to quickly find out which servers your computer is configured to use, and then I’ll discuss a couple of situations where you might want to use something different.

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What is “ping”, and what does its output tell me?

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Sometimes when I search for solutions for my home networking problem, I frequently see some people suggesting that I ping my PC by IP and/or by computer name. What does PING command actually do? What’s the point of using this command? How do I read and understand the results?

Ping is one of the oldest and most basic network diagnostic tools. It’s present in just about every modern, and even not-so-modern, operating system.

In concept, the tool is very, very simple: it sends out an “Are you there?” kind of request, and expects to hear back a “Yes, here I am!” kind of response.

Very basic, very simple, and yet very powerful as a first line of network troubleshooting.

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How does flushing a DNS cache help resolve some issues, and while you’re at it what’s DNS?

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I suddenly started to encounter ‘time-out’ error messages with certain sites – yours being one of them! On looking further, I could not find any logic to the dozen or so sites I regularly visit being unavailable. I tried accessing these sites through an online proxy – the sites loaded. I re-booted and ran all the adware / spyware / virus programs – all to no avail. I managed to Google the problem and found some obscure forum with the response ‘go to command line prompt and type “ipconfig /flushdns” ‘ which I duly did. Perfect – problem solved – but why did I need to do this, what is a DNS cache flush and how can I avoid this problem in the future?

Well, I can’t really say why that fixed your problem, since a reboot is also another way of flushing your DNS. In fact, it’s one of the many reasons tech support folks insist you reboot as the first step when investigating just about anything.

But you seem to indicate that a reboot actually didn’t help.

However, flushing the DNS cache can sometimes help, and it’s much faster than a reboot.

Read moreHow does flushing a DNS cache help resolve some issues, and while you’re at it what’s DNS?

Is my router acting as a DNS server?

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So when I access the command prompt and enter ipconfig/all one of the entries listed is “DNS Server” and IP address 192.168.x.x. I understand that my wireless router is my LAN’s default gateway and acts as the DHCP server – but DNS server? My operating system is Windows 7 Home Premium.

Yes, your router could in fact be acting as a DNS server. There are various reasons that it might be doing that, most of them related to speed.

First, let’s quickly review what DNS actually is.

Read moreIs my router acting as a DNS server?