Does cleaning cookies force me to re-verify my bank log-in?

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Hi, Leo. I believe that every time I run CCleaner, my bank doesn’t recognize me anymore. I then have to go through a whole rigmarole to get on to my account. It’s been suggested that the cause is that I’ve erased the cookie that my bank site has planted and therefore it doesn’t recognize my PC anymore. How can I identify its cookies so that I can isolate it so that CCleaner will not erase it. If you don’t agree, then what do you think is the problem?

I agree completely.

It’s absolutely the case that banks and other systems make heavy use of cookies to aid you in the quest for security, or to just make it possible for you to go from one page to the next without having to log in for every single page.

So, yes, cleaning out cookies, especially if you’re cleaning out all cookies, does exactly what you’ve described. It will force your bank (and you) to go through those extra steps.

Read moreDoes cleaning cookies force me to re-verify my bank log-in?

Scheduling CCleaner

It’s no secret that crap (pardon the language) piles up on our computers over time. Temporary files that don’t get cleaned up properly, assorted caches, histories, and backups of files that we might never need all seem to accumulate and can even negatively impact performance.

I use the word “crap” here specifically, because that’s what that initial “C” in CCleaner originally represented – “Crap Cleaner.”

Regardless of the political correctness of its name, then or now, CCleaner is a useful tool in managing the accumulation of “stuff” on your computer that might be doing nothing more than wasting space.

In the past, we’ve focused on running CCleaner as needed to clean things up when we think of it or encounter a problem.

The beauty of computers is that they’re very good at doing things automatically. That includes not only creating crap, but cleaning it up as well.

Read moreScheduling CCleaner

Using Windows Disk Cleanup

Over time, it’s not uncommon for files to accumulate on your system – unused files, old ones, or files you no longer need. There are many reasons for this, but most are pretty valid when you get down to the details.

Fortunately, you don’t need to get into the details to clean things up. Windows includes a disk-cleanup utility that’s helpful for cleaning this type of thing right up.

Let’s walk through the steps of using Windows Disk Cleanup.

Read moreUsing Windows Disk Cleanup

Why is Microsoft Security Essentials constantly saying potentially unprotected?

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Quite some time ago, I installed Microsoft Security Essentials as per your recommendation. I liked it right off the bat, but lately after turning my computer on, a small icon appears in the lower right-hand corner of the tray, telling me “Potentially unprotected” and that my virus protection is turned off and that my computer may be at risk. This happens occasionally, but now it’s happening every time. When I go to Microsoft Security Essentials, I see that my real-time protection is on and virus and spyware definitions are up-to-date. To get rid of this icon, I have to manually do an update every time. Once this is done, the icon disappears. This never used to happen until about three months ago or so. Do I have a virus in my system or malware or spyware wanting me to use their protector?

I’ve seen it, too. It seems to be fairly common.

I’ve run into several theories about why this might happen.

Read moreWhy is Microsoft Security Essentials constantly saying potentially unprotected?

Does cleaning cookies force me to re-verify my bank login?

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Hi, Leo. I believe that every time I run CCleaner, my bank doesn’t recognize me anymore. I then have to go through a whole rigmarole to get on to my account. It’s been suggested that the cause is that I’ve erased the cookie that my bank site has planted and therefore it doesn’t recognize my PC anymore. I use Firefox on XP. Do you agree? How can I identify its cookies so that I can isolate it so that CCleaner will not erase it. If you don’t agree then, what do you think is the problem?

No, I agree completely. It’s absolutely the case that banks and other systems where you need to log in make heavy use of cookies to aid you in the process to further secure your machine – or to just make it possible for you to go from one page to the next without having to log in for every single page. So, yes, cleaning out the cookies, especially if you’re cleaning out all cookies, does exactly what you’ve described. It will force your bank to go through those extra steps.

Read moreDoes cleaning cookies force me to re-verify my bank login?