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Pages I visit open in a tiny window, how do I make it bigger?

When I open a page it comes up in a little box, but then I click the square
it will open up all the way. Why is it doing this? It’s just a little oblong
box in one corner then it has a little square box where i click to make it open
all the way.

It sounds like you’re seeing something like this:

A VERY small window

This happens to people surprisingly often, and if you’re not really familiar
with adjusting windows to your liking, it can be very perplexing.

So, it’s time to cover a few fundamentals.

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Most programs open and operate in a “window” on your screen. That window has
three possible states:

  • minimized – the window is actually not shown, but appears
    as an icon in your task bar

  • maximized – the window is shown and is sized to take up
    your entire screen

  • restored – the word doesn’t make total sense, but this is
    when the window is open and visible, but at a size that is smaller than the
    size of your screen. In the “restored” state you can move the window around and
    change its size.

You may be seeing something like the image above, or perhaps something more
like this:

A small window

(I’m using Firefox in my examples, so if you’re using Internet Explorer or
experiencing this with some other program, things may look just a little
different for you. The concepts are the same, however.)

“… most programs, Internet Explorer and Firefox among
them, remember their most recent restored size.”

In both cases the window is actually in the “restored” state – it’s on
screen, not minimized, and it’s not taking up the entire screen.

The “little square box” you’ve been clicking on is the “maximize” icon in
the programs title bar. It puts the window in the maximized, full-screen state.
On its left is the “minimize” icon, which keeps the program running but makes
it accessible only through the task bar, and on its right is the close icon,
which is used to close the program completely.

Title bar icons: minimize, maximize and close

So when you click on that “little square box” you’re telling the program to
maximize itself and take up the entire screen.

There’s another approach to resolving this issue that, as we’ll see in a
minute, may actually be more helpful in the long run.

Move your mouse over one of the corners or side edges of the window until it
turns into a double arrow:

Double Arrow Mouse Cursor

This is an indicator that you can resize the window. While the
mouse is positioned as it is, click and hold the mouse, and drag it in
whichever direction would make the window larger. For example here I’ve grabbed
on to the lower right hand corner, so I’ll click, hold, and drag the mouse
further down and to the right:

Window made a more normal size

If a window is resizable, and not all are, then each corner and each side of
the window edge can be clicked on and held to drag the corner or side one
direction or another.

It’s a useful skill since windows aren’t always the most optimal size, and
making everything maximized means you can’t see what other programs are
doing.

Now, the $100,000 question: why did this happen?

The first thing to realize is that most programs, Internet Explorer and
Firefox among them, remember their most recent restored size. That
means the mere act of resizing the window instead of immediately maximizing it
should have resolved the issue for you. The next time the program starts up, it
should appear at the size you most recently left it.

The real question is how did it “remember” such a tiny size to begin
with?

There’s no real answer here, as there are many possibilities. The program
itself could have gotten confused or stray mouse movement or even confused
typing of a sort could have altered the window’s size before it was last
closed. A crash of either the application or the computer could have caused the
prior remembered size to have been lost or altered.

There’s really no way to know.

But the great news is that it’s easy to resolve with just a click and a
drag.

Do this:

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7 comments on “Pages I visit open in a tiny window, how do I make it bigger?”

  1. On some Vista boxes (mine included), no matter what you do, it just will not stick. I’ve tried everything registry tweaks included.

    There is a nice freebie out there call autosizer.
    http://www.southbaypc.com/AutoSizer/

    After spending many hours struggling on my HP, I gave up and used a program. I’m not sure if this is exactly the same one- as I paid $9.95 for it.

    Packrat1947

    Reply
  2. On the window sizing issue (sometimes the window is a smaller size), AOL (in particular) has a drop down tab labeled ‘window’ which is used to ‘remember’ window size and/or position.

    Reply
  3. Alternatively, for most programs, if you go to the location of the start-up Icon, [your desktop for example] right-click the program name and left-click “Properties”. On the “Shortcut” tab you’ll find a “Run” mini-window. Click on th down-arrow and select “Maximized”.

    Reply
  4. If Windows do not open to full size in IE7, follow these instructions.

    Open a webpage. Stretch it out to full size. Don’t use maximize.
    Choose any link on that webpage and right-click, select open in a new window.
    Stretch that second window out to the desired size- don’t use maximize.
    Close the first IE window. Then close that second resized window. This should take care of the problem

    Reply
  5. I had this small window problem in my XP and tried various remedies, but with no success. However,I then tried the Pete Ross solution. Sweet, short, and simple and it resolved this issue that was driving me crazy.
    Thanks Pete!
    Ron
    _______
    If Windows do not open to full size in IE7, follow these instructions.

    Open a webpage. Stretch it out to full size. Don’t use maximize.
    Choose any link on that webpage and right-click, select open in a new window.
    Stretch that second window out to the desired size- don’t use maximize.
    Close the first IE window. Then close that second resized window. This should take care of the problem

    Posted by: Pete Ross at January 19, 2008 8:43 PM

    Reply

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