Do I Need so Many Copies of the Microsoft Visual C++ Runtime?

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My initial machine included Microsoft visual C++ 2005 runtime (x64 and x86 on a window 7 64 bit os ?). Then on 4/29/13 Microsoft added visual C++2008 (x64 and x86) and then on 7/1/13 they added the visual C++2010 (x86 only on 64 bit os system??). We do not use this machine to program or for gaming. It is used for email and as a digital newspaper. None of the Microsoft visual C++ 2005/2008/2010(x86/x64) redistributable programs are listed in the programs list. So the question is do I really need the Microsoft visual C++ 2005/2008/2010 redistributable downloads??????

Yes, I’m sorry to say, you probably do.

When I started looking into this a little more deeply on one of my own Windows machines, I was pretty shocked to find no fewer than 59 different files all related to the Microsoft Visual C and C++ runtime. Fifty-nine!

This is a symptom of a problem faced by software vendors that, at it’s core, is unsolvable in any pragmatic sense. The problem even has a name: DLL Hell.

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Footnotes & references

1: Programmers, please rest assured that I know about things like lcase() and strtolower() and the existing functions to do exactly this. I’m choosing a simple example to make my point.
2: I chose “entertaining” over “depressing”.
3: In other operating systems, the duplication of the content of those files is still there, it’s just more commonly carried around within applications themselves.

Is there Software that Will Allow Me to Keep All the Software on My Machine Up to Date?

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Leo, is there a program updater out there that you recommend? I’m currently running Windows 7 on my laptop and Windows 8 on my desktop.

The answer really depends on what you mean by program updater. If you mean a third party program that will somehow keep track of all the various versions of all the various software that you have installed and try to manage updates for you, there are a couple to try. But it’s an incredibly difficult problem to solve and solve well.

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Do I need all these Office 2007 updates if I also have Office 2010?

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I’m running Windows 7 Home, 64-bit, SP1 on an HP laptop. Originally, I had Office 2007 Professional installed. I subsequently bought and installed a standalone copy of Outlook 2010. Later, I bought and installed a copy of Office Home and Student 2010. I did not uninstall Office 2007 because I wanted to retain the ability to use Publisher 2007. Now, when I run Windows Update, it wants me to install all of the updates for both 2007 and Office 2010. Why would I want to install updates to Word or Excel or PowerPoint or Outlook 2007 or install 2007’s huge SP3? Should I?

Yes, you want to take that update. If you have parts of Office 2007 on your machine and you have Office 2010 on your machine, then you want all of the updates for all of the software that’s installed on your machine. It’s more than just minor improvements and whatnot; it really is all about security.

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What is InstallShield and Do I Need its Update Service?

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Recently, I did a scan with Autoruns from Microsoft Sysinternals to see what I was loading at log on. I have a program called “ISUSPM.exe” loading at log on. I do not remember seeing it before so I did a search – and answers at Microsoft.com states that it’s “InstallShield Update Service Scheduler” and it searches for updates for software on my computer. It stated that it’s not needed and it can be unchecked/removed from starting at login. Have you seen this? What is it? What software does it update? Where did it come from? Do I need it? Can I safely remove it without leaving my software vulnerable?

InstallShield has been around for years and it’s certainly nothing malicious. In fact, most people have probably already used its software at one point or another.

InstallShield is the set up and installation technology that’s used by many other software vendors to write the set-up programs for their products.

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Will Existing Updates Still Be Available after Windows XP Support Ends?

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Does the 2014 end of support of Windows XP include removing the current downloads? For example, security updates, hot fixes, SP3? I’ve a retail CD, XP with SP2, but I still need these current downloads to fully utilize XP, don’t I? I read several answers to the XP end, but I didn’t find the answer to this particular scenario. Perhaps to rephrase, when I reinstall XP after support ends, will the updates, hot fixes and service pack 3 that I need today still be available online?

When support for Windows XP finally ends, the single most important thing to realize is that there will be no new fixes.

Even if a security vulnerability is discovered that impacts people running Windows XP, that vulnerability won’t be fixed. That’s the bottom-line implication of Windows XP support ending next year.

What does that mean for everything that’s already been produced?

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Should I Update to the Latest Internet Explorer?

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I have Windows 7 Home Premium, Service Pack 1. In the past, I’ve always been gun-shy to jump on the newest Microsoft release. On my computer, IE 9 takes second fiddle to Chrome. That said, along comes IE 10. In my experience, I usually wait about six months for them to work all the problems out before I update. So, what are your thoughts on the IE 10? Shall I wait a bit longer or jump?

Ultimately, if you’re running Chrome anyway, it’s a moot point. If you primarily use Chrome, just keep using it and keep it up-to-date (which Google does transparently for you).

I’d probably have you update Internet Explorer, but not for the reasons most people think.

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